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007  Physical Description Fixed Field (Nonprojected Graphic) (R)

Input Standards

Required if applicable/Optional
1st Indicator  Undefined
blank character Undefined
2nd Indicator  Undefined
blank character Undefined
Subfields (R=Repeatable  NR=Nonrepeatable) Input Standards
‡a Category of material (007/00) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡b Specific material designation (007/01) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡d Color (007/03) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡e Primary support material (007/04) (NR) Required if applicable/Required if applicable
‡f Secondary support material (007/05) (NR) Required if applicable/Required if applicable

Definition

 
All formats

The physical characteristics of a nonprojected graphic material. 007 is valid in all formats so you can code for the physical characteristics of the parts of an item such as accompanying material.

VIS

Use for pictures, charts, technical drawings, and other nonprojected graphic materials published separately or as individual components of a kit.

Examples

007     k ‡b f ‡d c ‡e o ‡f t
300     1 art reproduction : ‡b color ; ‡c 36 x 31 cm
500     In wooden frame, 51 x 41 cm.
007     k ‡b j ‡d b ‡e o
300     1 print : ‡b lithograph black & white ; ‡c image 33 x 41 cm, on sheet
007     k ‡b o ‡d c ‡e c ‡f e
300     16 flash cards : ‡b color ; ‡c 28 x 10 cm

1st Indicator

Undefined. The 1st indicator position is undefined and contains a blank ( blank character ).

blank character

Undefined

2nd Indicator

Undefined. The 2nd indicator position is undefined and contains a blank ( blank character ).

blank character

Undefined

Subfields

 
‡a Category of material

A one-character alphabetic code that indicates the category of material to which the item belongs is a nonprojected graphic.

k

Nonprojected graphic. The item is a nonprojected graphic, which is generally a two-dimensional pictorial representation, often opaque (e.g., print, photoprint, drawing) or transparent, and not intended to be projected for viewing (e.g., a photographic negative).

‡b Specific material designation

A one-character alphabetic code that describes the special class of material (usually the class of physical object) to which an item belongs (e.g., a picture).

a

Activity card. A card printed with words, numerals, and/or pictures to be used by an individual or a group as a basis for performing a specific activity.

c

Collage. An original work created by affixing various materials (paper, wood, newspaper, cloth, etc.) to a surface.

d

Drawing. An original visual representation (other than a print or painting) made with pencil, pen, chalk, or other writing instrument usually on paper or similar nonrigid support.

e

Painting. An original visual representation produced by applying paint to a surface.

f

Photomechanical print. Any picture produced in imitation of another picture through the use of photographic process to transfer the image to a printing surface. Hence, a snapshot made to document a painting or a Xerox copy of a print are considered photomechanical reproductions. Art reproductions are included here.

g

Photonegative. A piece of film, a glass plate, or pattern on which a negative image appears, i.e., directly opposite to a positive image (photoprint), slide, or transparency, used to produce a positive print. Photonegatives do not include negative photoprints, photoprints that are a combination of negative and positive images, or photograms or solarized prints, all of which are considered to be techniques used when making photoprints.

h

Photoprint. Photoprints have a positive image made either directly or indirectly on a sensitized surface by the action of light or other radiant energy. The term photoprint rather than photograph is used here as a more precise term than photograph, which technically can cover both the print and the negative. Opaque stereographs are included here.

i

Picture. A two-dimensional visual representation accessible to the naked eye and generally on an opaque backing. Used when a more specific designation is unknown or not desired.

j

Print. Design or picture transferred from an engraved plate, wood block, lithographic stone, or other medium. Generally there are four types: planographic print, relief print, intaglio print, and stencil print.

k

Poster. A notice, usually decorative or pictorial, intended to be posted to advertise, promote, or publicize an activity, cause, product, or service; also, a decorative, mass-produced print intended for hanging.

l

Technical drawing. Cross section, detail, diagram, elevation, perspective, plan, working plan, blueprint, etc., made for use in an engineering or other technical context.

n

Chart. An opaque sheet that exhibits data in graphic or tabular form, e.g., a wall chart.

o

Flash card. A card or other opaque material printed with words, numerals, or pictures and designed for rapid display.

p

Postcard. A card on which a message may be written or printed for mailing without an envelope.

q

Icon. An image that portrays a sacred entity and that is itself regarded as sacred. Most commonly comprising tempera on panel, but it may be in any two-dimensional or relief medium, including fresco.

r

Radiograph. A photograph produced by the passage of radiation, such as X rays, gamma rays, or neutrons, through an opaque object.

s

Study print. A picture or print, issued singly or in sets, with accompanying text, prepared specifically for teaching purposes; text might be printed on the verso of the print, in margins, or issued separately. The text might include descriptions, discussion questions, terms with definitions, and/or bibliography.

u

Unspecified. The special material designation for the nonprojected graphic is not specified.

v

Photograph, type unspecified.

z

Other. None of the other codes is appropriate. Includes mixed media productions made by a combination of free hand and printing techniques when one or the other does not predominate, computer produced graphics, spirit masters, transparency masters, etc.

‡d Color

The color characteristics of the nonprojected graphic.

a

One color. The image is printed or executed in a single color. Used for monochrome art works. It is not used with photographic materials. Does not include black.

b

Black-and-white. The image is printed or executed in black-and-white. Refers to monochrome photographic materials executed in black-and-white.

c

Multicolored. The image is printed or executed in more than one color. Used for color photographic processes.

h

Hand-colored. The image, produced by a printing or photographic process, is hand colored. Rarely used with commercial visual materials since these are not typically issued with hand coloring.

m

Mixed. The work or collection is a combination of one color, black-and-white, multicolored, hand colored, and/or other images.

u

Unknown. The color characteristics of the item are not known.

z

Other. None of the other codes is appropriate. Includes stained, tinted, or toned items (e.g., sepia toned photographic items).

‡e Primary support material

The primary support material is the type of material used for the support or base on which an image is printed or executed. Intended for use in handling and storage of material. You may not be able to determine the composition of primary support materials. If in doubt, do not use subfield ‡e.

a

Canvas. The primary support/base material is canvas, a heavy-duty plain-woven fabric used as a painting surface.

b

Bristol board. The primary support material is Bristol board, a fine, smooth pasteboard used by artists and painters. It consists of a high-grade white cardboard, supercalendered with China clay or made by pasting together sheets of heavy ledger paper.

c

Cardboard/illustration board. The primary support material is cardboard or illustration board, consisting of laminated paper board that has paper layers glued to its surface; used commonly as temporary artists' supports.

d

Glass. The primary support material is glass, a hard, brittle substance, typically transparent or translucent.

e

Synthetic. The primary support material is a man-made substance other than textiles, plastic, and vinyl. Formerly, this code included plastic and vinyl in its definition.

f

Skin. The primary support material is skin, the thin layer of tissue forming the natural outer covering of the body of an animal. Excludes leather, parchment, and vellum. Synthetic materials that are made to resemble animal skin are coded as synthetic. Formerly, this code included parchment, leather, and vellum in its definition.

g

Textile. The primary support material is a textile. Includes all natural or synthetic fiber fabrics (e.g., silk, linen, nylon, etc.) except canvas. Synthetic materials formed to resemble a fabric are considered textiles.

h

Metal. The primary support material is metal, a substance (such as gold, tin, or copper) that usually has a shiny appearance, can be melted, and is usually capable of being shaped.

i

Plastic. The primary support material is plastic, a synthetic material made from a wide range of organic polymers that can be molded into shape while soft, and then set into a rigid or slightly elastic form.

l

Vinyl. The primary support material is vinyl, a typically tough, flexible, and shiny resin.

m

Mixed collection. The primary support material varies for different items in a collection. Typically this would be used for groups of nonprojected graphics on various bases.

n

Vellum. The primary support material is vellum, fine-grained unsplit lambskin, kidskin, or calfskin prepared especially for writing or drawing on.

o

Paper. The primary support material is any kind of cellulose-based paper, a substance made from wood pulp, rags, or other fibrous material, usually in thin sheets.

p

Plaster. The primary support material is plaster, a mixture of lime or gypsum, sand, and water that hardens to a smooth solid. Use also for mixtures of ground solids and plaster.

q

Hardboard. The primary support material is hardboard, a material consisting of any firm, dense, rigid board, often manufactured from fiber consolidated under heat and pressure in a hot press.

r

Porcelain. The primary support material is porcelain, a hard white vitrified translucent ceramic. Used only for clay-based porcelain. Porcelain-like synthetic materials are coded e.

s

Stone. The primary support material is stone, a hard, solid, compact, nonmetallic mineral matter.

t

Wood. The primary support material is wood, the hard fibrous material that forms the main substance of the trunk or branches of a tree or shrub. Material that is based on wood particles or fibers may or may not be considered wood. Consider particle board wood.

u

Unknown. The primary support material is not known.

v

Leather. The primary support material is leather, animal skin dressed for use.

w

Parchment. The primary support material is parchment, the skin of a sheep or goat prepared for writing on.

z

Other. A primary support material for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡f Secondary support material

The secondary support material is the type of material (other than normal museum matting) to which the primary support (subfield ‡e) is attached. Used only when the mount or mat is of historical, informational, aesthetic, or archival importance. You may not be able to determine the composition of secondary support materials. If in doubt, or if there there is no secondary support, do not use subfield ‡f.

a

Canvas. The secondary support material is canvas, a heavy-duty plain-woven fabric used as a painting surface.

b

Bristol board. The secondary support material is Bristol board, a fine, smooth pasteboard used by artists and painters. It consists of a high-grade white cardboard, supercalendered with China clay or made by pasting together sheets of heavy ledger paper.

c

Cardboard/illustration board. The secondary support material is cardboard or illustration board, consisting of laminated paper board that has paper layers glued to its surface; used commonly as temporary artists' supports.

d

Glass. The secondary support material is glass, a hard, brittle substance, typically transparent or translucent.

e

Synthetic. The secondary support material is a man-made substance other than textiles, plastic, and vinyl. Formerly, this code included plastic and vinyl in its definition.

f

Skin. The secondary support material is skin, the thin layer of tissue forming the natural outer covering of the body of an animal. Excludes leather, parchment, and vellum. Synthetic materials that are made to resemble animal skin are coded as synthetic. Formerly, this code included parchment, leather, and vellum in its definition.

g

Textile. The secondary support material is a textile. Includes all natural or synthetic fiber fabrics (e.g., silk, linen, nylon, etc.) except canvas. Synthetic materials formed to resemble a fabric are considered textiles.

h

Metal. The secondary support material is metal, a substance (such as gold, tin, or copper) that usually has a shiny appearance, can be melted, and is usually capable of being shaped.

i

Plastic. The secondary support material is plastic, a synthetic material made from a wide range of organic polymers that can be molded into shape while soft, and then set into a rigid or slightly elastic form.

l

Vinyl. The secondary support material is vinyl, a typically tough, flexible, and shiny resin.

m

Mixed collection. The secondary support material varies for different items in a collection. Typically this would be used for groups of nonprojected graphics on various bases.

n

Vellum. The secondary support material is vellum, fine-grained unsplit lambskin, kidskin, or calfskin prepared especially for writing or drawing on.

o

Paper. The secondary support material is any kind of cellulose-based paper, a substance made from wood pulp, rags, or other fibrous material, usually in thin sheets.

p

Plaster. The secondary support material is plaster, a mixture of lime or gypsum, sand, and water that hardens to a smooth solid. Use also for mixtures of ground solids and plaster.

q

Hardboard. The secondary support material is hardboard, a material consisting of any firm, dense, rigid board, often manufactured from fiber consolidated under heat and pressure in a hot press.

r

Porcelain. The secondary support material is porcelain, a hard white vitrified translucent ceramic. Used only for clay-based porcelain. Porcelain-like synthetic materials are coded e.

s

Stone. The secondary support material is stone, a hard, solid, compact, nonmetallic mineral matter.

t

Wood. The secondary support material is wood, the hard fibrous material that forms the main substance of the trunk or branches of a tree or shrub. Material that is based on wood particles or fibers may or may not be considered wood. Consider particle board wood.

u

Unknown. The secondary support material is not known.

v

Leather. The secondary support material is leather, animal skin dressed for use.

w

Parchment. The secondary support material is parchment, the skin of a sheep or goat prepared for writing on.

z

Other. A secondary support material for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

Indexing

For indexing and searching information, see Searching WorldCat Indexes, field 007.

For information on the relation of material types to RDA terms and codes, see Searching WorldCat Indexes, RDA Terms and Codes.

For information on material type indexing in various OCLC services, see Searching WorldCat Indexes, Material Type (includes links in Notes row to RDA terms and codes and Format or Document codes and values).

For information on material type names and codes (based mainly on the Leader, 006, 007, 008), see Searching WorldCat Indexes, Material Type Names and Codes.

Printing

Field 007 does not print.

This page last revised: December 2, 2013