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007  Physical Description Fixed Field (Videorecording) (R)

Input Standards

Required if applicable/Optional
1st Indicator  Undefined
blank character Undefined
2nd Indicator  Undefined
blank character Undefined
Subfields (R=Repeatable  NR=Nonrepeatable) Input Standards
‡a Category of material (007/00) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡b Specific material designation (007/01) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡d Color (007/03) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡e Videorecording format (007/04) (NR) Required if applicable/Required if applicable
‡f Sound on medium or separate (007/05) (NR) Required if applicable/Required if applicable
‡g Medium for sound (007/06) (NR) Required if applicable/Required if applicable
‡h Dimensions (007/07) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡i Configuration of playback channels (007/08) (NR) Optional/Optional

Definition

 
All formats

The physical characteristics of a videorecording. 007 is valid in all formats so you can code for the physical characteristics of the parts of an item such as accompanying material.

VIS

Use for videorecordings and accompanying sound characteristics. Use also for videorecordings published separately or as individual components of a kit.

Examples

 
 
007     v ‡b d ‡d c ‡e v ‡f a ‡g i ‡h z ‡i q
300     1 videodisc : ‡b sound, color ; ‡c 4 3/4 in.
344     digital ‡b optical ‡g surround ‡h Dolby ‡2 rda
347     video file ‡b DVD video ‡e region 1 ‡2 rda
007     v ‡b f ‡d c ‡e c ‡f a ‡g h ‡h r ‡i s
300     1 videocassette (29 min.) : ‡b sound, color ; ‡c 3/4 in.
344     analog ‡b magnetic ‡g stereo ‡2 rda
346     U-matic ‡b NTSC ‡2 rda
007     v ‡b f ‡d b ‡e b ‡f a ‡g h ‡h o ‡i m
300     1 videocassette : ‡b sound, black and white ; ‡c 1/2 in.
344     analog ‡b magnetic ‡g mono ‡2 rda
346     VHS ‡b PAL ‡2 rda
007     v ‡b d ‡d c ‡e s ‡f a ‡g i ‡h z ‡i q
300     1 videodisc : ‡b sound, color ; ‡c 4 3/4 in.
344     digital ‡b optical ‡g surround ‡h Dolby ‡2 rda
347     video file ‡b Blu-ray ‡e region A ‡2 rda
007     v ‡b f ‡d c ‡e a ‡f a ‡g h ‡h o ‡i s
300     1 videocassette : ‡b sound, color ; ‡c 1/2 in.
344     analog ‡b magnetic ‡g stereo ‡2 rda
346     Beta ‡b SECAM ‡2 rda

1st Indicator

Undefined. The 1st indicator position is undefined and contains a blank ( blank character ).

blank character

Undefined

2nd Indicator

Undefined. The 2nd indicator position is undefined and contains a blank ( blank character ).

blank character

Undefined

Subfields

 
‡a Category of material

A one-character alphabetic code that indicates the category of material to which the item belongs is a videorecording.

v

Videorecording. The item is a videorecording, which is defined as a recording on which visual images, usually in motion and accompanied by sound, have been registered. It is designed for playback on a television receiver or video monitor.

‡b Specific material designation

A one-character alphabetic code that describes the special class of videorecording (usually the class of physical object) to which an item belongs (e.g., a videodisc).

c

Videocartridge. A videorecording on tape encased in a cartridge and which has the ends joined together to form a continuous loop.

d

Videodisc. A flat disc of plastic or other material on which video signals, with or without sound, are recorded. Various videodisc systems include laser-optical, capacitance, and magnetic.

f

Videocassette. A videorecording on tape encased in a cassette that runs reel-to-reel.

n

Not a motion picture, filmstrip, or videorecording. Do not use. Code n is obsolete but may still appear in some records.

r

Videoreel. A videorecording on a spool of tape mounted on a reel and designed to play from reel-to-reel across a playback pick-up device.

u

Unspecified. The specific material designation for the videorecording is not specified.

z

Other. A videorecording for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡d Color

The color characteristics of a videorecording.

a

One color. Do not use with videorecordings.

b

Black-and-white. A videorecording executed in black-and-white.

c

Multicolored. A videorecording executed in more than one color.

m

Mixed. The work or collection is a combination of black-and-white, colored, and/or other images.

n

Not applicable. The item has no images, e.g., a videorecording with sound only.

u

Unknown. The color characteristics of the videorecording are not known.

z

Other. A videorecording for which none of the other codes is appropriate (e.g., videorecording is toned, stained, tinted, etc.).

‡e Videorecording format

The videotape or videodisc recording format. If a bibliographic record for a videorecording describes various available formats, e.g., Beta and VHS videocassettes, then a separate 007 field is input for each.

a

Beta (1/2 in., videocassette). The home video system introduced in 1975 by Sony for home videorecording and playback on 1/2 inch videotape. It is distinguished by the size of the cassette, its U-load tape threading, and technical capabilities. This format is also known as Betamax.

b

VHS (1/2 in., videocassette). The home video system introduced in 1977 by Japan Victor Corporation (JVC) for home videorecording and playback on 1/2 inch videotape. It is distinguished by the size of the cassette, its M-load tape threading, and technical capabilities. VHS stands for "Video Home System."

c

U-matic (3/4 in., videocassette). A video format using Sony's trademark name which refers to its tape threading path in a U-shape. It is the worldwide standard for 3/4 inch videotape and is used extensively in industrial and broadcast production. Like the two 1/2 in. home video formats, it uses a helical scan recording system. It is also known as U type standard.

d

EIAJ (1/2 in., reel). The standard 1/2 inch reel-to-reel helical scan videotape system named for the Electronics Industries Association of Japan, which set the standards for 1/2 inch video tape recorders manufactured since 1969. It may be referred to as "the old trailblazer."

e

Type C (1 in., reel). Used for the one-inch videotape recording system utilizing one video head and tape that runs at 9.61 inches per second. Type C videotape was introduced by Ampex and Sony in 1976. It was used widely as the broadcasting standard in the U.S. and overseas until being superseded in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Type C equipment and technology were also made by RCA, Hitachi, and others. Use code z for Type B videotape (a one-inch tape system using two video heads, running at 9.65 ips, introduced by Bosch in 1976, and used widely in Europe) and for Type A (a one-inch tape system introduced by Ampex in 1965 and obsolete by the late 1970s).

f

Quadruplex. (1 in. or 2 in., reel). As opposed to the helical scan system, which uses one head, the Quadruplex videorecording system uses four videorecording heads. Often referred to as Quad, it was developed by Ampex in the mid-1950s. It provided higher quality resolution and color than did helical scanning. Quadruplex was the broadcast standard until recently, when less expensive helical scan systems have begun to overtake it. When describing a 2 inch videoreel that is not Quadruplex, use the code z (Other).

g

Laserdisc. A laser optical (reflective) videorecording system that uses an analog technique called PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) to represent video information on a grooveless, smooth, round plastic disc. The disc is read (played back) by a weak laser beam that registers data appearing on the disc as tiny pits or depressions of varying lengths. Laserdiscs exist in three standard commercially produced sizes: 12, 8, and 4 3/4 inch diameters. The 12 inch disc is the most common size and is typically used for movies; the disc or its packaging usually bears an LD trademark (the phrase "LASER DISC" or "Laser Vision" usually appears as the lower part of that LD trademark); alternatively, LASER VIDEODISC, DiscoVision, LaserDisc, LaserVision, or a similar phrase may appear instead of the LD trademark. The 8 and 4 3/4 inch discs are uncommon and typically used for music videos or other short video programs; the disc or its packaging usually bears one of these terms or trademarks: CDV (CD VIDEO), VSD (VIDEO SINGLE DISC), or LD (LASER DISC). This system started commercial use in 1978, but production declined rapidly after 1998 due to the success of the DVD format.

h

CED (Capacitance Electronic Disc) videodisc. The CED videorecording system is based on a plastic disc, usually 12 inches in diameter, on which visual information is recorded as deep pits in the bottom of the grooves. This visual information is read by a needle-in-the-groove type of electronic stylus that translates variance in capacitance into a video and audio signal. The CED disc is characteristically housed in a protective jacket. In 1984, the manufacturer of CED players, RCA, announced its decision to cease production of the "RCA Selectavision" players.

i

Betacam (1/2 in., videocassette). The Betacam videorecording format is a professional analog format using component coding recorded on 1/2 inch oxide tape, housed in a cassette.

j

Betacam SP (1/2 in., videocassette). The Betacam SP videorecording format is a professional analog format using component coding recorded on 1/2 inch metal tape, housed in a cassette. It is designed to yield a higher grade recording than the regular Betacam format, providing improved video quality and a better audio signal-to-noise ratio. There are two analog video tracks plus two FM (CD quality) audio tracks.

k

Super-VHS (1/2 in., videocassette). The Super-VHS format, which was originally designed for the consumer market, encodes analog signals using a helical scan on 1/2 inch ferric-oxide tape, housed in a standard cassette. It has gained acceptance professionally in the broadcast industry and is now considered a professional format. Super-VHS format machines encode 400 lines of horizontal resolution and can play back videotapes recorded on regular VHS machines. Super-VHS requires high-grade tape and a high-resolution monitor equipped with separate Y/C (Luminance/Chrominance) video inputs. Super-VHS-C is the same video format but uses a special compact mini-cassette (often used with hand-held video cameras). These mini-cassettes can be used with standard VHS recorders by means of a special adapter cassette into which the mini-cassette is inserted.

m

M-II (1/2 in., videocassette). The M-II videorecording format is a professional analog format using 1/2 inch metallic tape, housed in a cassette. It was developed by Panasonic as an alternative to the Betacam format developed by Sony.

o

D-2 (3/4 in., videocassette). The D-2 videorecording format is a professional digital videorecording format using composite coding on 3/4 inch metal particle tape, housed in a cassette. The digital encoding allows for multi-generation signal transfer (copying or dubbing) without signal degradation. Duplicate recordings are effectively identical to the original master. There are four independently editable PCM audio channels, offering a dynamic range of more than 90 db (decibels). Additionally, it has separate tracks for an analog audio cue and time code.

p

8 mm. The 8 mm video format is designed for small consumer-market camera/recorders (camcorders) using 8 mm metal particle tape, housed in a mini-cassette. The video quality is comparable to standard VHS. The audio quality is superior to similar mini formats.

q

Hi-8 mm. An 8 mm video format designed for higher resolution than standard 8mm tape. It is a consumer-market format that uses 8 mm metal particle or evaportated metal tape, housed in a mini-cassette.

s

Blu-ray Disc. An optical disc format designed for high-definition video and data storage developed by Sony/Phillips. Blu-ray uses a blue-violet laser with a shorter wave length to allow for greater data storage in a smaller space. Requires a special player to view the disc.

u

Unknown. The videorecording format is not known.

v

DVD. A Laser optical (reflective) videorecording system that uses a digital technique called PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) to represent video information on a grooveless, smooth, round plastic disc. The disc is read (played back) by a weak laser beam that registers data appearing on the disc as tiny pits or depressions of uniform length. DVDs are usually 4 3/4 inch in diameter (but a smaller 3 inch diameter disc may be produced commercially in some cases) and the disc or its packaging usually bear the term or trademark: DVD, DVD VIDEO, or VIDEO CD (in this case, the trademark is the standard one for COMPACT DISC, but with the added phrase DIGITAL VIDEO below it). This system has been in use commercially since late 1996.

z

Other. A videorecording format for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡f Sound on medium or separate

Indicates whether the sound is on the item or separate from the item (i.e., on the accompanying material). Assume that the item has sound and that the sound is on the medium, unless otherwise noted. If sound is not present (i.e., the item is intended to be silent), do not use subfield ‡f.

a

Sound on medium. Sound is on the item, whether or not visual images are included.

b

Sound separate from medium. Sound is on a separate medium, designed to accompany the images.

u

Unknown. The presence or absence of sound on the item is not known

‡g Medium for sound

The specific medium used to carry the sound of an item, whether that sound is carried on the videorecording or is separate, and the type of sound playback required for the item. Subfield ‡g is used in conjunction with the information coded in subfield ‡f (Sound on medium or separate) and subfield ‡h (Dimensions). Typically, the carriers of sound are: 1) magnetic track encased in a cassette or cartridge; 2) audio or video tape which may be on reel or encased in a cassette or cartridge; and 3) sound or video disc. If sound is not present (i.e., the item is intended to be silent), do not use subfield ‡g.

a

Optical sound track on motion picture film. Sound to accompany a videorecording is carried on an optical track that is part of a motion picture film. It would be rare for this to occur.

b

Magnetic sound track on motion picture film. Sound to accompany a videorecording is carried on a magnetic track that is part of a motion picture film. It would be rare for this to occur.

c

Magnetic audio tape in cartridge. Sound to accompany a videorecording is carried on a magnetic audio tape cartridge.

d

Sound disc. Sound to accompany a videorecording is carried on a sound disc. Sound discs include 7, 10, and 12 inch vinyl phonograph records and 4 3/4 inch compact discs.

e

Magnetic audio tape on reel. Sound to accompany a videorecording is carried on a reel of magnetic audio tape.

f

Magnetic audio tape in cassette. Sound to accompany a videorecording is carried on a cassette of magnetic audio tape.

g

Optical and magnetic sound track on motion picture film. Sound to accompany a videorecording is carried on both an optical and magnetic track on a motion picture film. It would be rare for this to occur.

h

Videotape. Sound to accompany a videorecording is included as part of the videotape. Videotape is not ordinarily used to record only sound.

i

Videodisc. Sound to accompany a videorecording is included as part of the videodisc. Videodiscs are not ordinarily used to record only sound. A distinction must be made between videodiscs (e.g., 12 inch laser optical videodiscs that include video information) and compact discs that are used to record sound only (e.g., 4 3/4 inch audio compact discs). The technology to physically record video or audio information on digital disc systems is the same.

u

Unknown. The medium for sound to accompany the videorecording is not known.

z

Other. A medium for sound to accompany a videorecording for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡h Dimensions

The width of the videorecording. Codes a, m, o, p, q, and r are all for the width of videotape. For videorecordings, only codes that exactly match the measurements of the item as given in the physical description should be used. If no code exactly matches, code z is used. Code z is also used for all videodiscs.

a

8 mm.

m

1/4 in.

o

1/2 in.

p

1 in.

q

2 in.

r

3/4 in.

u

Unknown. The width of the videorecording is not known.

z

Other. A videorecording width for which none of the other codes is appropriate. Used for all videodisc dimensions since standard code values for videodiscs do not yet exist.

‡i Configuration of playback channels

The configuration of intended playback channels for the sound portion of a videorecording. This should be coded based on a clear indication of intended playback. These codes do not refer to the configuration of channels originally recorded unless those channels are all intended to be available on playback.

k

Mixed. More than one configuration of playback channels for the sound portion is available on a single videorecording. An example would be a tape with both monaural and stereophonic sound tracks.

m

Monaural. The sound portion of a videorecording is configured to be played back on one channel.

n

Not applicable. The videorecording has no sound or the sound is on a separate medium. When describing an item with separate sound (subfield ‡f is coded b), the configuration of playback channels for the separate sound track would be described in another 007 representing the sound recording on accompanying material (e.g., sound on cassette).

q

Quadraphonic, multichannel, or surround. The sound portion of a videorecording is configured to be played back on more than two channels. Use this code for Dolby surround sound tracks and other multichannel techniques.

s

Stereophonic. The sound portion of a videorecording is configured to be played back on two separate channels. Use code s when the medium is not monaural and it is not possible to ascertain that multiple playback sources are available or intended.

u

Unknown. The configuration of playback channels for the sound portion of a videorecording is not known.

z

Other. A configuration of the sound portion of a videorecording for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

Indexing

For indexing and searching information, see Searching WorldCat Indexes, field 007.

For information on the relation of material types to RDA terms and codes, see Searching WorldCat Indexes, RDA Terms and Codes.

For information on material type indexing in various OCLC services, see Searching WorldCat Indexes, Material Type (includes links in Notes row to RDA terms and codes and Format or Document codes and values).

For information on material type names and codes (based mainly on the Leader, 006, 007, 008), see Searching WorldCat Indexes, Material Type Names and Codes.

Printing

Field 007 does not print.

This page last revised: November 25, 2014