Which Andy is that? Are you sure?

 
My name is Andy Dale and I am a new member of the OCLC team. I am honored to have been invited to add my voice to the OCLC blogs. My title at OCLC is Consulting Software Engineer, Identity Management and Authentication. Over the last couple of years there has been a race to put the suffix '2.0' on every concept known to man. Tim O'Rielly is often credited with first coining the term Web 2.0 back in 2003 and since then it's been a rush to the door 2.0. One of the 2.0's that I have been very involved with is Identity 2.0 and I am now starting to work to see how Identity 2.0 and Library 2.0 interact. In my blog posts I will try to introduce some of the concepts behind Identity 2.0 and how they might be leveraged to enhance the library experience. My knowledge of Identity technology and policy is deep; my knowledge of how things REALLY work in libraries is nascent at best. I will speculate and hypothesize about the collision of the ideas that drive Identity 2.0 and the use-cases and pain-points of working libraries. I look to you, the readers of this blog, to help correct my misunderstandings and help me find the points where my particular knowledge can be leveraged to add value to library software implementation. Some of the things that I will blog about soon are: OpenID, Information Cards, Claims Based Authorization, Single Sign-On and Federated Authentication. At times I will write high level explanations of the concepts, at times, forgive me, I will delve into the nuance of one representation of an identifier vs. another. I look forward to this dialog with the library community. If you want to contact me you can do so through my i-name by clicking here: =andy.dale (More about i-names and contact pages soon :-) )

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