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Collective Insight: viewing parties

Localize the conversation by hosting your own viewing party!

"Collective Insight: Driven by Shared Data" is an OCLC series of events and programs that bring library staff and industry leaders together to engage in conversations around timely and relevant themes of importance to libraries today. OCLC members around the world are invited to join in the conversation—and by hosting a viewing party, you can bring the conversation to you when it fits your schedule and meets your needs.

By making these special presentations available via recordings or webcasts, the content can be leveraged to stimulate conversation and inspire future solutions at the local level. Viewing parties provide an easy way to re-use this content for your local audience. OCLC provides hosting institutions or organizations with all of the tools to launch a successful event.

Plan your party

  1. Identify the event(s) you would like to host by reviewing the list of upcoming events.
  2. Complete this form to tell us which events you've selected. An OCLC event planner will contact you to coordinate your event.
  3. Review our Viewing Party Planning Guide.
  4. Questions? Contact us.

 

Select from the following presentations:

 

OCLC Symposium on "Culturomics" | 28 June 2013
OCLC Member Meeting and Symposium at ALA, Chicago, Illinois

This session focused on the opportunity to examine shared data in new ways that help us make better decisions, learn about the information ecosystem and impact how we live. Participants explored how libraries play a compelling role in helping our communities make sense of that information in useful and innovative ways.

About the Symposium
Speakers:
 
Jean-Baptiste Michel, Visiting Scientist, Harvard University
Jean-Baptiste Michel is a French and Mauritian scientist at Harvard University. His research focuses on big data at the interface of biology and the social sciences. In 2012, Jean-Baptiste was named a TED Fellow and one of Forbes '30 under 30,' the brightest young minds in the sciences. He is an Engineer of Ecole Polytechnique, and received an MS in Applied Math and a PhD in Systems Biology from Harvard.
 
Erez Lieberman Aiden, Assistant Professor of Genetics at Baylor College of Medicine and of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics at Rice University
Erez Lieberman Aiden is Assistant Professor of Genetics at Baylor College of Medicine and of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics at Rice University. His research spans many disciplines and has won numerous awards, including the President's Early Career Award in Science and Engineering, which is the US government's highest honor for scientists in the early stages of their careers, a $2.5M NIH New Innovator Award; the GE & Science Prize for Young Life Scientists; the Lemelson-MIT prize for the best student inventor at MIT; and membership in Technology Review's 2009 TR35, recognizing the top 35 innovators under 35.

Together, Erez and Jean-Baptiste develop quantitative approaches to the study of history and culture that rely on computational analysis of a significant fraction of the historical record, an approach they call culturomics. Their work led to the creation of the Google Ngram Viewer, a website for browsing cultural trends that was visited over three million times in the 24 hours after its launch. Their research has been featured on the covers of Nature and Science and on the front page of the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and the Wall Street Journal. Their talk describing this work, at TED.com, has been viewed over one million times. They are the authors of the forthcoming book Uncharted: Big Data and an Emerging Science of Human History (Riverhead Books).

Video recording will be made available upon scheduling your event »

 

"Clear Pictures from Complex Data" | Noah Iliinsky,
Lorraine Haricombe and Cathy De Rosa | 10 April 2013

OCLC Symposium at ACRL, Indianapolis, Indiana

Maggie Farrell, Dean of Libraries at the University of Wyoming, and OCLC Board of Trustees member, welcomed in-person and virtual participants to this event. Keynote speaker Noah Iliinsky, Visualization Expert at IBM's Center for Advanced Visualization, co-author of Designing Data Visualizations and editor/contributor to Beautiful Visualization from O’Reilly Media, presented "Four Pillars of Data Visualization." Then Lorraine Haricombe, Dean of Libraries at University of Kansas, and Cathy De Rosa, OCLC Vice President for the Americas and Global Vice President of Marketing, provided a summary of findings from the cooperative's report (to be published May 2013), "Parents, Alumni and Libraries: What our customers really believe about the library."

Preview content »

 

"Print Management at 'Mega-scale': a Regional Perspective on Print Book Collections in North America" | Brian Lavoie, Constance Malpas | 14 March 2013
Webinar

In this OCLC Research webinar, Brian Lavoie and Constance Malpas explained how they utilized urbanist Richard Florida's mega-regions framework and the WorldCat bibliographic database to explore the North American print book resource as a network of regionally consolidated shared collections. In addition, they provided examples of how they are applying this framework to specific consortia contexts.

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"Implications and Opportunities of Big Data" | Alistair Croll | 25 January 2013
Americas Member Meeting and Symposium at ALA Midwinter, Seattle, Washington

Alistair Croll, Principal Analyst at Bitcurrent, gave the OCLC Symposium keynote at ALA Midwinter, kicking off the “Collective Insight” member engagement discussion series. Alistair shared an overview of Big Data and insights into how Big Data intersects the world of library and information services.

 

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